Autism Diagnoses May Decline in the Future Due to New Criteria

Last May, a special report called the Diagnostic and Statistic Manual of Autistic Disorder, volume 5 (DSM-5) was published by the American Psychiatric Association.

Autism Diagnoses may decline in the future due to new criteria. Last May, a special report called the Diagnostic and Statistic Manual of Autistic Disorder, volume 5 (DSM-5) was published by the American Psychiatric Association. This report led to a new mathematical approach to looking at children with autism.

The main reason for the change was due to confusion in the clinics. DSM-5 was categorizing Asperger’s syndrome as part of the autism spectrum disorder. The spectrum will now have a scale ranging from slightly Aspergian to in need of full care for evaluations. The two disorders, Asperger’s and autism, were distinguished from each other by cognitive delay and a lack of language, which in itself was not the criteria used to diagnose autism. As the study says, “most, if not all, people with Asperger’s syndrome do meet diagnostic criteria for autism.” This is why they merged both syndromes into each other to date.
DSM-5 comes 19 years following the last guidebook and 13 years after it was revised in 2000. In-between these years the number of autism incidences increased due to broad categories. The goal was not to reduce the number of children with autism, but to take away some of the subcategories that were previously difficult to delineate and distinguish.

For more facts on autism, please visit,http://www.icare4autism.org/news/category/autism-symptoms/


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