Learning to Bicycle with Autism

Only 20% of children with autism learn to ride a bicycle

With the recent splurge of spring weather that has swept over the United States, many people are left wide-eyed for spring to finally appear in full force. However, this season comes with its own challenges and disadvantages for children with autism.

For most children, there are basic pieces of childhood that make up their ‘kid experience.’  Everyone’s list may be different but most include one thing— learning to ride a bicycle. Unfortunately, less than 20 percent of kids with autism and 10 percent of those with Down syndrome learn to ride a bike.

Here at the International Center for Autism Research and Education, inc. (ICare4Autism) we have come across an interesting video online. CBS anchor Seth Doane reports, in the attached video clip, there is an annual camp in Ann Arbor, Michigan that is set on helping these special children pass their obstacles.


Watch CBS Videos Online

This entry was posted in Autism Media Coverage and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Post a comment or leave a trackback: Trackback URL.

3 Comments

  1. tara mckenna
    Posted March 19, 2010 at 2:47 pm | Permalink

    HELLO MY SON IS 8 YEARS OLD AND AUTISTIC. HE WOULD LOVE TO LEARN HOW TO RIDE A BICYCLE. HE TRIES AND TRIES HARD BUT CANNOT DO IT….HE NEEDS HELP!!! WE LIVE IN NEW YORK QUEENS ARE THERE ANY PROBLEMS AVAILABLE CLOSER TO NEW YORK PLEASE LET ME KNOW dtw622@aol.com

  2. tara mckenna
    Posted March 19, 2010 at 2:47 pm | Permalink

    HELLO MY SON IS 8 YEARS OLD AND AUTISTIC. HE WOULD LOVE TO LEARN HOW TO RIDE A BICYCLE. HE TRIES AND TRIES HARD BUT CANNOT DO IT….HE NEEDS HELP!!! WE LIVE IN NEW YORK QUEENS ARE THERE ANY PROBLEMS AVAILABLE CLOSER TO NEW YORK PLEASE LET ME KNOW dtw622@aol.com

  3. JP Singh
    Posted September 27, 2010 at 3:17 am | Permalink

    hi tara, I had the same problem with my 10 year old. he was fine to ride with stablizers but could not do it without. we tried hard but it just would not happen. I hired a coach over the week. she came in for an hour and at the end of the hour he was driving his bike without any stablizers and any adult help. It is two days since we now go on regular bike rides. the trick is to get help if you cannot do it yourself. anyone who teaches cyclying should be able to help. it might take more than one lesson but you son will be able to do it. the technique they apply is called scooting. take the pedals off the bike, adjust the seat so thier feet are touching the ground. ask them to push the bike with thier feet. this will give them the balance. once they are comfortable with scooting and taking thier feet of ground put the pedals back on and get them to try.

    good luck!

Post a Comment

Your email is never published nor shared.

You may use these HTML tags and attributes <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

  • Latest News

    Play-Place for Autistic Children: An Autism Wonderland

    Play-Place for Autistic Children’s vision is to pioneer experiences that combine the magic of hope with the power of play and recovery with an innovative support center in Michigan.

    Father Pushes to Get Autism Awareness Sign

    A resident of Tonawanda, New York, successfully convinced the town to install two signs alerting drivers that an autistic child lives in the area. Louis Blazer said that he and one other family were pushing to get the sign installed because they both have highly autistic children. He said he wanted to protect his son before it was too late.

    Autism Could Cost Americans $1 Trillion by 2025

    Caring for individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder in the United States is becoming pricier. Alarming numbers have been calculated in a new study published online in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, conducted by Paul Leigh and Juan Du, health economists at the University of California, Davis.

    App Created For and By Teens with Autism Aids Daily Activities

    Dubbed LOLA, which stands for “Laugh Out Loud Aide,” a new app aims to remind children on the autism spectrum to complete certain tasks that they may forget about, which could be due to a sensory overload that they experience.

  • More Autism News