The Possible Link between Antidepressants and Autism Disorders

A recent study by John Hopkins University has discovered that there is a significant link between prenatal exposure to antidepressant medications and Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) in boys. Researchers found that early prenatal exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), taken for depression and anxiety, significantly increased the risk of ASD. The SSRIs in discussion include Zoloft, Celexa, Lexapro, Prozac, and Paxil. The researchers from the Bloomberg School of Public Health at John Hopkins discovered that the intake of these drugs increased the risk for ASD three-fold.

This study included nearly 1,000 mother-child pairs from the Childhood Autism Risks from Genetics and the Environment (CHARGE) study, a case-control study. The researchers broke down the data into three groups: those diagnosed with ASD, those with developmental delays (DD), and those with typical development (TD). The children studied ranged from 2 to 5 years old, and the majority of the children were boys. Furthermore, 82.5% of the group with Autism Spectrum Disorders consisted of boys. While girls were included in the study, the substantially stronger effect in boys alone suggests possible gender differences in the level of exposure from SSRIs.

Dr. Li-Ching Lee, researcher at John Hopkins states, “we found prenatal SSRI exposure was nearly three times as likely in boys with ASD relative to typical development, with the greatest risk when exposure took place during the first semester.” He continues, “SSRI was also elevated among boys with DD, with the strongest exposure effect in the third trimester”.

Serotonin is critical to brain development, especially in its very early stages, so exposure to drugs that may affect serotonin levels can have significant effects on the developmental outcomes of the child. The intake of SSRIs have increased significantly in recent years, and therefore scientists are focused on further examining if these drugs have played a large factor in the dramatic rise of Ausism disorders in the U.S. About one-third of children with Autism has serotonin levels that are higher than average. Researchers think that these high levels play a huge role in the development of abnormal brain circuitry.

”This study suggests that there are some risks associated with SSRI exposure and that the risk is higher in boys,” states Dr. Eric Hollander, Director of the Autism and Obsessive Compulsive Spectrum program at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Dr. Hollander also states that even if research confirms the much higher risk for boys after SSRI exposure, mothers should know that the risk is still low.

The ICare4Autism International Conference will be discussing additional research studies on July 2nd in NYC. Among the speakers is Dr. Hollander, Chairman of ICare4Autism’s Advisory Council, who will be discussing the recent advances in Autism research. To select tickets, please click here.

As Autism Awareness Month continues, ICare4Autism will be sharing more of the cutting-edge ways that scientists and researchers are studying Autism disorders. We will also be highlighting several self-advocates and stories of hope. We hope that you will share these stories, and use the month of April to spread awareness about Autism! Please make a difference and donate today!

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Reaching Out to Individuals with ASD

As Autism Awareness Month continues, it is imperative to incorporate those with the disorder into our communities, and make them feel comfortable enough to establish friendships with them. Although individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) may have trouble interacting with others, that does not mean they want to avoid establishing friendly relationships. Therefore, it is important to understand how to approach those with ASD and make them feel comfortable. Now that 1 in 68 children in the U.S. are diagnosed with ASD, virtually every grade of every elementary school has a child that is affected by the disorder. Adults and children alike should make more of a conscientious effort to reach out to those affected by the disorder.

As a first impression, many individuals with ASD appear anxious, irritable, or disconnected. Once someone gets to truly know the person, they can see their true characteristics, their strengths, and what makes them unique. A quarter of those affected by ASD are nonverbal, but they may still be able to communicate through writing, sign language, or using other physical motions. None of this diminishes the fact that those with ASD may be very intelligent, capable, and talented people. “I think if Autistic kids could say one thing to people, it would be this: Don’t give up on me”, states Leslie Phillips, mother of a 14-year-old Autistic son.


As we respect Autism Awareness Month, one should consider several things in order to pursue a friendship with those affected by ASD. For one, do not assume that he or she does not value friendship. Although there are challenges communicating with an individual with ASD, that does not mean they will simply disregard any friendship that gets established. One should also be patient with those affected by Autism, and to be sensitive to the fact that they are trying their best to interact. It takes time for those with the disorder to build trust to open themselves to others.

When pursuing a friendship with someone with Autism, you should also speak clearly and effectively. You should speak literally, and not use figures of speech that could be confusing. Gestures, pictures, and expressions, are also very effective at reaching out to someone with ASD. You should also make solid plans to spend time with this person. It is important to spend time with them on a regular basis, and let them know they have someone that they can rely on to sit with at lunch or during a school event.

Most importantly, being friends with an Autistic individual should be based on authenticity, and not be treated like a project. No one is looking for pity friendships, but rather a true bond that lasts regardless of one’s differences. One should respect their Autistic friend’s struggles, and do their best to make them feel comfortable in school or work environments. When an individual with ASD has a strong support system, they will feel more confident in showcasing their personality and their strengths. This will benefit them as they approach higher education and potential employment opportunities.

The ICare4Autism International Conference will be discussing the programs that are being developed to incorporate Autistic individuals in the workforce, as well as the best educational plans for those with the disorder, in NYC from June 30th to July 2nd. Speakers include Dr. Peter Gerhardt, Founding Chair of the Scientific Council for Autism Research, who will be discussing the important transition from high school to possible employment for those with ASD. To hear Dr. Gerhardt speak, please select tickets here.

As Autism Awareness Month continues, ICare4Autism will be sharing more important facts about Autism, as well as stories of hope. We will be highlighting self-advocates who are able to showcase their strengths and talents, despite their obstacles. We will also share recent research findings, and scientific advances. We hope that you will share these stories, and use the month of April to spread awareness about Autism! Please make a difference, and donate today!

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Photography Project Provides New Opportunities for Individuals with ASD

Autistic individuals are now exploring a new way to experience the world and express themselves: through photography. A group of Autistic adults have become members of the In-Focus Project, which teaches men and women with ASD how to run their own online photography store. Each person learns how to take pictures, make edits, upload their photos to their own online page, and package and ship them to buyers.

In-Focus was established in 2008 by Ian Paregol, Executive Director of Community Services for Autistic Adults and Children (CSAAC), and Craig Pardini, Director for Building Facilities at CSAAC. Paregol and Pardini teamed up to teach a weekly photography class at the center, because many Autistic individuals find that they can best express themselves visually. By giving the men and women a foundation for skills in photography, Paregol and Pardini were able to challenge their adult students to explore new things, as well as create a passion for them to pursue for years to come.

Ian Paregol and one of his student photographers.
(photo credit: WTOP/Alicia Lozano)

Not only has photography helped with their creativity and expression, but it has truly boosted their communication skills, as each individual interacts with many others during their shoots, as well as when someone makes a purchase of their work. According to Pardini, “This [program] gives them an opportunity to share what they are seeing [with others] and show what’s in their mind”.

Recently, the photographers went to the Thomas Jefferson Memorial in Washington, D.C. The photographers took advantage of the beautiful scenery, abundant with cherry blossoms, taking creative photos of the world around them. Some of the individuals chose to interact with others, taking photos of their friends taking pictures, or asking to take pictures of tourists.

“This certainly gives them self-esteem,” Paregol stated. He continued, “But it also gives them a chance to connect with their community.” Many of the photographers have become much more expressive since joining the project, as they feel less pensive about approaching strangers, and happy to showcase their work to others.

The ICare4Autism International Conference will be discussing the Global Autism Workforce Initiative, and the strategies to develop and promote one’s skills and strengths, on June 30th in NYC. Speakers include Randy Lewis, former Executive Vice President of Supply Chain and Logistics at Walgreens. During his career, Mr. Lewis established an integrated workforce, including those with Autism disorders. Several speakers, including Mr. Lewis, will be discussing the importance of establishing new opportunities that cater to the various strengths of individuals with ASD. To hear Mr. Lewis speak, please select tickets here.

As Autism Awareness Month continues, ICare4Autism will be sharing more opportunities that have been developed for those with Autism disorders. We will also be sharing new medical research and scientific advances, as well as highlighting several self-advocates and stories of hope. We hope that you will share these stories, and use the month of April to spread awareness about Autism! Please make a difference and donate today!

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Lipid Imbalances in the Brain May Trigger ASD

Researchers have recently stated that abnormal levels of lipid molecules in the brain can possibly trigger Autism disorders. Heavy amounts of lipid molecules can affect the interaction between two key neural pathways in the brain.

Several factors can affect the levels of lipids in early prenatal brain development, including environmental factors, exposure to chemicals in cosmetic products, and the use of over-the-counter medications. Professor Dorota Crawford of the York Autism Alliance Research Group states, “We have found that the abnormal level of a lipid molecule called Prostaglandin E2 in the brain can affect the function of Wnt proteins, [which is] important because it can change the course of early embryonic development”. Prostaglandin E2 is a bioactive fatty acid, a natural lipid molecule involved in healthy, normal functioning of the human body.


The research is significant, as scientists are focused on finding the reasons why so many children have been diagnosed with ASD in recent years. Currently, the rate of children diagnosed with Autism disorders in the U.S.is 1 in 68. “The statistics are alarming,” states Crawford. She continues, “It’s 30 percent higher than the previous estimate of 1 in 88 children, up from only two years earlier. It’s even more apparent from [recent findings] that the environment might have a greater impact on vulnerable genes, particularly in pregnancy. Our study provides some molecular evidence that the environment likely disrupts certain events occurring in early brain development and contributes to autism.”

According to Crawford, genes do not undergo significant changes in evolution, so even though genetic factors are the main cause, environmental factors are significant. According to the research team, insufficient dietary supplementations of fatty acids, exposures to infections, various chemicals, and drugs can change gene expression could possibly trigger Autism disorders.

The ICare4Autism International Conference will be discussing recent medical research and giving biomedical perspectives in NYC on July 1st. Several medical professionals will be giving presentations, including Dr. Paulo Fontoura, Global Head/VP of Translational Medicine for Roche Pharmaceuticals. Dr. Fontoura will be giving a speech on recent advances in translational medicine. To hear Dr. Fontoura speak, please select tickets here.

As Autism Awareness Month continues, ICare4Autism will be sharing more scientific discoveries, as well as promising treatments for individuals with ASD. We will also be highlighting several self-advocates and stories of hope. We hope that you will share these stories, and use the month of April to spread awareness about Autism! Please make a difference and donate today!

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Therapy Method Shows Promise in Autistic Children

Many children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) often become fixated on a particular interest. Therapists often use a child’s interests or obsessions to connect with them and evolve their social skills. Furthermore, scientists are now suggesting that these interests can be used to develop one’s skills in a deeper way.

This method, called “affinity therapy”, came about after a clinical trial based on the idea that some children can develop social and emotional instincts through the characters they love. Animated characters are very strong stimuli, as the emotions expressed by each character are highly exaggerated. The way they express themselves, and the music that accompanies their reactions, often provides insight of how to react appropriately in social situations.

Researchers John D. E. Gabrieli of M.I.T., Pamela Ventola of Yale, and Simon Baron-Cohen of the University of Cambridge, who has presented for ICare4Autism at previous conferences, are proposing a study to test this approach. “We individualize therapy to each child already, so if the child has an affinity for certain animated characters, it’s absolutely worth studying a therapy that incorporates those characters meaningfully,” states Dr. Kevin Pelphrey, Director the child neuroscience laboratory at Yale. These researchers are composing a 16-week trial for 68 children with Autism between the ages of 4 and 6. Half of these children will receive affinity therapy, using the movies or shows they love as a framework to enhance social interaction and build connections. This could potentially lead to feeling more comfortable expressing themselves, making eye contact, and participating in play with others. The other half of the group will engage in free play with the therapist.


Dr. Pelphrey states that the affinity approach could incorporate many elements of pivotal response treatment, which involves a system of rewards into the normal interactions between the therapist (or parent) and child. For example, a 7 year old child involved in a trial at Yale became fixated on bubbles. When the therapist stopped blowing bubbles, the boy had to look in the direction of the therapist, make eye contact, and express that he wanted him to continue. Eye contact and perspective taking (recognizing another’s point of view) developed quickly in this method of therapy. Dr. Pelphrey states that affinity therapy would incorporate similar techniques.

The ICare4Autism International Conference will be discussing the current methods of Autism treatment, as well as scientific advances and research findings in NYC on July 1st. Among the speakers is Dr. Pamela Wolfberg, Professor of Autism Spectrum Studies at San Francisco State University, and Director of the Autism Institute on Peer Socialization and Play. Dr. Wolfberg will be giving a presentation on the benefits of social inclusion in play, and how it can maximize the developmental potential of children with Autism. To hear Dr. Wolfberg speak, please select your tickets here.

As Autism Awareness Month continues, ICare4Autism will be sharing more of the treatments that are being used for children with ASD, as well as scientific findings and new research discoveries. We will also be highlighting several self-advocates and stories of hope. We hope that you will share these stories, and use the month of April to spread awareness about Autism! Please make a difference and donate today!

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New Blueprint Gives Insight on Brain Development

Researchers at the Allen Institute for Brain Science have recently generated a high-resolution blueprint for how to build a human brain. Encompassed is a detailed map of various genes which are turned on and off during pregnancy. The data that was collected from this BrainSpan Atlas provides exceptional insight into the origins of human uniqueness, as well as the origin of Autism disorders, which are linked to early brain development.

The human brain is one of the most complex things to study, yet its basic structure is created within just nine months. This comprehensive map will enable researchers to have a better grasp of disorders and behavior problems that appear before birth, even if they don’t manifest until the individual is in their teens or 20s.

Ed Lein, Investigator at the Allen Institute, states, “Knowing where a gene is expressed in the brain can provide powerful clues about what its role is.” He continues, “[this] gives a comprehensive view of which genes are on and off while the brain is developing during pregnancy.” Essentially, this blueprint will give a better understanding of human development, and to understand the pieces necessary for the brain to form properly. It also investigates what may go wrong to lead to disorders.

Although all developmental disorders can benefit from increased knowledge of how genes are expressed in the developing brain, researchers have focused on Autism, as scientists believe it forms in early brain development. According to Ed Lein, “We used the maps we created to find a hub of genetic action that could be linked to Autism, and we found one.” He continues, “These genes were associated with the newly generated excitatory neurons in the cortex, the area of the brain that is responsible for many of the cognitive features affected in Autism, such as social behaviors.” This discovery is an exciting example of the capabilities of the BrainSpan Atlas to provide insight about Autism and other developmental disorders in the brain.

Dr. Eric Hollander, Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, and Chairman of the ICare4Autism Advisory Board, has focused on breaking autism down into the different core and associated symptom domains and finding relevant genes, understanding the specific brain circuits, and developing specific treatments for each of the different symptom domains. In order to treat Autism, Dr. Hollander states that there must be early intervention. With the BrainSpan Atlas, researchers will have the ability to gain a better understanding of when and where disorders may originate. This can potentially lead to earlier treatments for many children with signs of ASD.

The ICare4Autism International Conference will take place on June 30th to July 2nd in NYC. One of the days will focus on significant medical studies and research findings for Autism Disorders. Speakers include Dr. Hollander, who will be discussing recent advances in Autism research, as well as lead a question and answer session. To hear Dr. Hollander speak, please select tickets here.

As Autism Awareness Month continues, ICare4Autism will be sharing more of the cutting-edge ways that scientists and researchers are studying Autism disorders. We will also be highlighting several self-advocates and stories of hope. We hope that you will share these stories, and use the month of April to spread awareness about Autism! Please make a difference and donate today!

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Autism Therapy Method Focuses On Play

A lesser-known treatment method for children with Autism is now gaining acceptance and being recognized by national Autism organizations and medical experts. The Developmental, Individual-Difference, Relationship-Based Model, or DIR/Floortime, is a multidisciplinary approach that centers on each child’s natural emotions and personal interests.

DIR/Floortime was developed by the late Dr. Stanley Greenspan, a psychiatrist and professor at George Washington University Medical School. The focus of this method has been not to change inappropriate behaviors, but to meet the child at the level where they are emotionally. The method takes the child’s feelings, relationships, and individual differences, into account and it builds multiple skills while connecting with others.


Many children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) have a very detailed focus. For example, a child may spend an hour playing with a string. In Floortime, the therapist will also begin to play with the string, and will pretend the string is a snake, or play hide-and-seek with it. The goal is to help the child learn through playful fun, increasing the rate of their intellectual and emotional development. The method aims to focus on what the child is interested in, as well as plays to their strengths, to make them feel comfortable and more willing to participate in an activity.

The method has seen success in several children with ASD, including first-grader Hayden Widner. Hayden has been attending Floortime therapy sessions for over a year, and has been developing motor skills, as well as ways to express himself. Recently, Hayden had a hard time sharing toys with his 3-year-old brother, so Floortime focused on teaching him how to cope with his feelings, and not to take them out on his brother. His mother has seen much improvement in how he treats his sibling, as well as the fact that he no longer feels the need to throw things out of anger.

With Floortime, all of the child’s actions are assumed to be purposeful. It is the caregiver’s or parent’s role to follow the child’s lead and help him develop social interaction and communication skills. This method has been incorporated in the educational programs of several school systems, as well as in the families who prefer play-based therapies as a primary treatment for young children with ASD.

The ICare4Autism International Conference will be discussing current Autism treatments and educational strategies on July 2nd in NYC. Speakers include Dr. Dana Reinecke, Chair and Assistant Professor of Applied Behavior Analysis at The Sage Colleges. Dr. Reinecke has done extensive research on the use of play and games to teach social behavior in students with Autism. She will be discussing the current practices being used to treat children with ASD, as well as where the road is headed for future treatments. To hear Dr. Reinecke speak, please select tickets here.

As Autism Awareness Month continues, ICare4Autism will be sharing more information about the latest treatments for children with ASD, as well as significant research findings. We will also be highlighting several self-advocates and stories of hope. We hope that you will share these stories, and use the month of April to spread awareness about Autism! Please make a difference and donate today!

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Learning Apps Promote Safety for Children with ASD

It has been evident in recent news that certain technology has been very beneficial in helping children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) develop various skills, and learn how to communicate. Recently, a new game has been developed which helps teach children about the people that they are likely to encounter in their communities, as well as cultivate important safety skills.


CampDiscovery, the free learning app developed by the Center for Autism and Related Disorders (CARD), released the Community Helpers game to teach children about the “helpers” they are likely to see and interact with in their neighborhoods, such as doctors, teachers, police officers, and firefighters. Players are taught to identify the various helpers by their titles, by what they do, and what location they might be found in. “While we often teach children to avoid strangers, it is important to teach them about the people that are there to assist them in the community”, states Dennis Dixon, Ph.D., Chief Strategy Officer of CARD.

Another tool that has helped Autistic children and teens develop their communication skills is Autism Expressed. This interactive learning system teaches the digital skills that have become essential in communicating in today’s world. Although many schools are utilizing basic technology to enhance various skills of Autistic individuals, Autism Expressed actually introduces real world applications of technology. Students have the opportunity to learn how to how to navigate the Web, how to utilize social network platforms, and understand the importance of online safety.

The ICare4Autism International Conference will be discussing the latest technology developments for individuals with ASD on July 2nd in NYC. Well-respected speakers will be discussing the significant relevance of learning apps and various technologies to aid in the development of multiple skills for children with Autism, including Michele McKeone, Founder and CEO of Autism Expressed. Ms. McKeone will be presenting a workshop that demonstrates the uses and benefits of the program. To attend this conference, please select tickets here.

As Autism Awareness Month continues, ICare4Autism will be sharing more information about the latest advances in Autism treatment, research findings, and medical news. We will also be highlighting several self-advocates and stories of hope. We hope that you will share these stories, and use the month of April to spread awareness about Autism! Please make a difference and donate today!

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New Indicators for Autism Spectrum Disorders

As many people know, there is no simple, singular test that can diagnose whether or not a child has Autism. Autism Spectrum Disorders vary greatly, and the way a child is affected is very unique and complex. The process of diagnosing a child often takes months or years of evaluations by physicians and psychiatrists. However, there are now tools that have shown great promise in providing an earlier diagnosis. Early diagnosis and intervention is very beneficial to the child, as parents and doctors can plan the optimal strategy to provide the child the best care and education that suits their needs.

Since 2007, The American Academy of Pediatrics has called for all children between the age of 18 and 24 months to be screened for Autism. They have given parents a questionnaire which asks them to evaluate their child’s behavior, social cues, and motor skills. Over the span of a decade, the questionnaire has proved very effective in signaling which children should undergo further evaluation. Although they have seen success with the questionnaire, The Academy has explored newer tools to diagnose children more effectively and with greater accuracy.

Many studies have discovered that eye-tracking is a great measure of a child’s focus and ability to communicate with another. The length of time an infant can hold eye contact with another person is a great indicator of the possibility of ASD. According to a study by LiveScience, children as early as 2 to 6 months were shown to have a steady decline in eye contact, and they were later diagnosed with ASD. Currently, eye-tracking technology consists of complex computer programming, but researchers hope to develop the tool into something that can be used outside of a laboratory.

Another successful tool has been brain imagining. Not only has brain imaging helped researchers understand the foundations of Autism, but it has also improved in making diagnoses. Boston Children’s Hospital has found that it can use electroencephalograms, or EEGs, to identify factors that distinguish a child with ASD. Another scientific indicator is blood testing. Research has shown that genetics play a strong role in the development of Autism disorders, and therefore they have focused on studying the genes that they believe express a risk for Autism.

Lastly, online-tests have shown promise in revealing possible Autism disorders in young children. Tests, such as the Modified Checklist of Autism in Toddlers (M-CHAT) take only a few minutes, and can decipher whether or not a parent should focus on taking their child to a doctor for further evaluation. Although these tests are not as cutting-edge as other tools, they may play a fundamental role in flagging symptoms.

The ICare4Autism International Conference will be discussing scientific advances and medical research on July 1st in NYC. Speakers include Dr. Martha Herbert, Pediatric Neurologist, Assistant Professor of Neurology at Harvard Medical School, and Director of the TRANSCEND Research Program. Dr. Herbert will be discussing the importance of research and evaluation to detect signs of ASD. To hear Dr. Herbert speak, please select tickets here.

As Autism Awareness Month continues, ICare4Autism will be sharing more scientific news and significant research findings. We will also highlight self-advocates and stories of hope, through both entertaining and informative material, that we hope you will share with others. The month of April is a call to action for everyone to support the Autism community!

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iPads Have Shown Promise in Children with ASD

Researchers have recently discovered that the use of tablets such as iPads, as well as specific apps, can be used to assist in the development of various skills for children with an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Although there is no cure for the disorder, several methods have shown great promise in improving behavior and developing skills, including the use of technology. Experts have found that simple, carefully constructed apps have enabled children to communicate efficiently, because the software is predictable and more comfortable than human interaction. App designers across the globe have become dedicated to formulating programs specifically to aid in the development of skills in children.

For example, Toca Boca in Sweden is dedicated to making digital apps for children, to encourage their creativity and develop multiple skills. Toca Band, one of their apps, encourages children to learn about rhythm, and create music with their own unique style. These apps have proved very popular among children with ASD. Toby Price, who has a non-verbal Autistic daughter that uses the apps, states, “She now uses her iPad to show us things she wants, or places she would like to go. She uses it to practice handwriting, and even counting.” He adds, “As a parent, [I am] happy to have found a way to engage our kids with iPads”.

In a recent study, researchers from Canada studied non-verbal Autistic children in their classrooms, who were each given iPads for a six-month trial. There was a statistical improvement in overall communication skills for 75% of the students studied. The tablets were also found to increase motivation, attention, and the level of social interaction among the children. Teacher Sarah Quickenden states, “The normal curriculum that we were offering just wasn’t allowing them to demonstrate these skills to us. We never realized that the children had these skills, because some of them were so locked in.”

Another example of success occurred at Shema Kolainu – Hear Our Voices, school and center for children with Autism in New York. Daniel, a 3-year-old preschool student, was considered non-verbal, as he refused to communicate with words or even gestures. Despite his frustration, his teachers were hopeful that one day Daniel would find a way to express himself. Eventually, Daniel began repeating the names of things he liked, including “iPad”. His communication abilities expanded further as he began forming bits of sentences, such as “want iPad”. His ability to convey his longing to use this item was quite astounding, as he once was unable to express his wants or needs.

The ICare4Autism International Conference will be taking place in NYC from June 30th to July 2nd. One of the days will highlight the developments in technology that are being used in Autism treatments and educational strategies. This includes a workshop presented by Michele McKeone, founder and CEO of Autism Expressed, who will be showcasing how her program allows children and teens to utilize technology to build lifelong skills. To attend this conference, please select tickets here.

Additionally, today marks World Autism Awareness Day. Globally, people and organizations are promoting awareness through various events and activities. At ICare4Autism, we will be highlighting the need for more awareness throughout the entire month. We will be utilizing this special opportunity by sharing inspirational stories, important scientific news and research findings, as well as some entertaining and informative material that we hope will enlighten some of you, and encourage you to share the information with others. The entire month of April is a call to action to support the Autism community.

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