Autistic Enterocolitis: The Ugly Case Against Leaky Gut

(Photo By: Flickr / Evil Erin)

A study in England that sparked the anti-vaccine autism movement involving Measles, Mumps Rubella (MMR) vaccine and autism, has lead to the consideration of dismissing “Leaky Gut” or Autistic Enterocolitis. The disease is now being investigated due to the unreliability of previous scientific evidence.

Journalist Brian Deer’s article appears in The British Medical Journal (BMJ) and cites that the studies of Autistic Enterocolitis conducted by Dr. Andrew Wakefield in 1998 misdiagnosed 11 out of the 12 children involved.

The study, which took place at Royal Free Hospital, claimed the 11 children had “non-specific” colitis, which is the inflammation of the large intestine with emphasis on the colon. Dr. Wakefield then linked the children’s Enterocolitis with the Measles, Mumps Rubella (MMR) vaccine.

After throwing England into an anti-vaccine panic, the news then spread to the U.S. where the debate continues between MMR and autism. Autistic Enterocolitis, though, is inspiring many theories on autism and diet, which science has yet to comment upon.

Respectfully, Sir Nicholas Wright, from Barts and the London School of Medicine, points out that, “We should remember, as recent experience in several fields has shown, that although science has its defects, it is a self-correcting process.”

The actual biopsies taken from the children who participated in the study are no longer available to study when considering Autistic Enterocolitis. What scientists are looking at now is how the current evidence may dismiss Autistic Enterocolitis as a new disease.

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